Deal Interactive Map - Click on one of the locations below - Zoom bar for fine tuning

  • Deal

    8 miles NE of Dover, off the A258, a fishing port and friendly seaside resort, Deal is a delightful jumble of narrow lanes which make dog-legs to divert the driving winds from the Channel. It is a 17th to 19th century townscape that, overall, amounts to more than the sum of its individual buildings.
    These include St Leonard's Church, which is part Norman, but with a cupola maintained by Trinity House as a landmark for shipping, The stately Royal Marine barracks towards Walmer, and three castles built by Henry VIII, namely Deal, Sandown and Walmer. The town is home to the famous Royal Cinque Ports Golf Club.
  • Deal Castle

    For a fascinating day out on the Kent coast look no further than Deal Castle. Built by the order of King Henry VIII it is one of the finest Tudor artillery castles in England, and among the earliest and most elaborate of a chain of coastal forts, which also includes Calshot, Camber, Walmer and Pendennis Castles. Today you can explore the whole of the castle, from the storerooms to the first-floor captain’s residence. Take a walk around the defences and admire the squat, rounded bastions and canons. If you enjoy cycling, a pleasant cycle path links Deal and Walmer Castles along the beachfront.
  • Victoria Park Deal

    Victoria Park is an open grassed area, which encompasses the Tides Leisure Complex and Deal Indoor Tennis Centre.
    The grounds are used for a variety of leisure activities including football, tennis, bowls and skateboarding/in-line skating.
    A children’s play area and teen shelter are provided and the Deal gym club is sited at the town end of the site. There is also a floodlit multi-use games area.
    Pitches/Courts
    Football
    Adult £50.50
    Junior £20.00
    Tennis (per court per hour)
    Adult £4.70
    Junior £1.60
    Online bookings
    English Landscapes provide an online booking service
    Website: www.el-doversports.co.uk
    Telephone: 01304 825569
  • Gazen Salts Nature Reserve

    Gazen Salts would in Roman times have formed the bottom of the Wantsum Channel, a straight of water which divided Kent from the Isle of Thanet. It is from this history the "Salts” part of the name is derived. Gazen is a corruption of the name of a lease holder of the saltings, John Gason.
    In 1970 European Conservation Year was a campaign launched to alert Europe of the importance of protecting and conserving the environment. This inspired Sandwich Borough Council (now Sandwich Town Council) to designate an area within the historic Town as a nature reserve. By 1973 an area of land had been selected, comprising of a two grazed fields, old allotments, later a disused builders yard would be added and land adjacent to the River Stour which also bordered the reserve, comprising of valuable reed beds. Only one small Hawthorn tree the size of a bucket was present on these bleak and barren fields.
    Reserve Opening Times – There are no restrictions to the reserve, although to see it at it's best and for your safety and security, we would recommend you visit between dawn and dusk.
    Please note NO DOGS ALLOWED ON THE RESERVE
  • Fowlmead Country Park

    Fowlmead Country Park, near Deal in East Kent, has a two mile tarmac cycle track, leisure paths for cycling and walking and established woodlands, wetlands and reed beds full of wildlife.
    Bike hire is available, as is a Confidence Course, BMX Pump Tracks and Orienteering and a host of adventurous outdoor activities for children's parties, schools and groups, including Archery, Cycling, Fossiling, Geo-Caching and Den Building.
  • The Secret Gardens of Sandwich

    The Secret Gardens of Sandwich, which is encircled by the old stone city walls, is an oasis of serenity waiting to be explored. At the heart of this stunning Kent attraction stands the Grade I-listed manor house, The Salutation, which was designed by famous English architect Sir Edwin Lutyens.
    Lutyens also devised the three-and-a-half acres of ornamental gardens with the help of Gertrude Jekyll. After lying neglected for 25 years, The Secret Gardens has undergone a remarkable transformation in the last four years thanks to the dedication of the owners and their determined team. Now restored to its original beauty, The Secret Gardens really is one of the finest gardens in Kent today.
  • Wingham Wildlife Park

    Wingham Wildlife Park first opened its doors as Wingham Bird Park in 1986, changing its name to Wingham Wildlife Park approximately 15 years later. The park is now so much more than birds, since it was given a new lease of life, when it was taken over by new owners on Valentines day 2008.
    Come and see the vast number of changes and improvements which have been made to the park since 2008, all of which led to us being Kents most popular attraction during the 2012 Kent Big Weekend. And there is still so much more to be added.
  • Barnsole Vineyard

    Barnsole Vineyard is a boutique vineyard and winery in Kent. We grow our own grapes and process them into wine in our purpose built winery, located in the pastoral countryside, just outside of Canterbury.
    We offer free admission to visitors who can see the grapes being grown and the wine being made, followed by a free wine tasting. Our wines includes award winning still white wine, still red wine and English sparkling wine.
    We offer a free mini wine tour that lasts 20 minutes. Or visitors can choose to take a full tour (for £2.50) where we talk about the origins of wine, the story of English wine, vineyard techniques and an explanation of the wine making process.
    Sales of our wine are exclusively from the winery door.
    Open every day 10.30 – 16:00. Please call in advance during the winter months.
  • Walmer Castle

    Built during the reign of King Henry VIII, Walmer Castle is one of the most fascinating visitor attractions in the South East. Originally designed as part of a chain of coastal artillery defences it evolved into the official residence of the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports. The Duke of Wellington held the post for 23 years and enjoyed his time spent at the castle and in recent years Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother made regular visits to the castle. The armchair in which Wellington died and an original pair of 'Wellington boots' along with some of the rooms used by the Queen Mother are among the highlights. And with the magnificent gardens, a woodland walk and some excellent bird spotting there's something for everyone to enjoy. There is also a pleasant cycle path along the beach front to nearby Deal Castle.
  • De Bradelei Wharf

    De Bradelei Wharf Dover provides a great days shopping by the sea at one of Kent’s leading shopping attractions. Situated just off Dover promenade within a superb maritime setting in the shadow of Dover Castle & the famous white cliffs, De Bradelei Wharf offers a relaxing atmosphere in which to shop and save.
    Within the store a host of big name brands to rival any high street await with discounts of up to 70% off rrp. Whether it’s Ladies & Men’s Fashion, Shoes, Bedlinens, Gifts, Books, Kitchen & Cookshop, there’s certainly something for everyone.
    The Waves Restaurant overlooking Dover Marina offers a comprehensive selection of freshly prepared hot & cold throughout the day. A perfect spot to enjoy a delicious lunch or afternoon tea providing a relaxing break for bargain hunters.
    Ideally situated just off the A20, follow the signs for Dover Seafront for a day’s Discount Shopping by the Sea.
  • Dover Castle

    For a great family day out in Kent, visit Dover Castle! Spectacularly situated above the White Cliffs of Dover this magnificent castle has guarded our shores from invasion for 20 centuries - now you can enjoy a great family day out with a visit to the 'Key to England'. Explore the darkly atmospheric Secret Wartime Tunnels including the vivid recreation of the Dunkirk evacuation in Operation Dynamo: Rescue from Dunkirk, complete with dramatic projections of swooping Spitfires and real film footage. Enjoy a colourful contrast with the richly-furnished Great Tower, where costumed actors introduce medieval life at King Henry II's court. With exciting exhibitions, winding tunnels to explore, ghosts to hunt out - and of course restaurants, shops and the space for youngsters to run around - an action-packed, great value day out awaits!
  • Russell Gardens

    Russell Gardens is situated on the opposite side of the road from Kearsney Abbey and is laid out in a more formal style.
    Facilities are available for tennis and putting and a play area is provided for children.
    Bushy Ruff is situated at the western end of the recreation grounds and is set around a lake. This is laid out as a country park and provides an open space for dog walkers and those who simply enjoy taking a walk in pleasant natural surroundings.
    Tennis (per court per hour)
    4 Grass courts available during summer season (1st May - 30th Sept)
    Adult £4.70
    Junior £1.60
    Online bookings
    English Landscapes provide an online booking service
    Website: www.el-doversports.co.uk
    Telephone: 01304 825569
  • Kearsney Abbey

    The gardens at Kearsney Abbey are laid out as informal parkland around two ornamental lakes through which the River Dour flows. The abbey itself was demolished many years ago although the west wing remains and is now used as a café facility for visitors to the park. The site is popular at all times of the year but especially in the summer time when the lawns become a favourite picnic site at weekends. A play area for children is available and the lower lake is used for model boating.
    Alkham Rd Temple Ewell Dover CT16 3EQ
  • St Margaret's at Cliffe

    St Margarets at Cliffe is the village centre where church, shops, hall, pubs, fire-station, school and houses cluster around the main route through the village. St Margarets Bay designates the area closest to the sea and includes Heritage Coast lands, the Lighthouse and the beautiful Pines Garden. This is an area popular with walkers and with the South Foreland Valley includes sites of special scientific interest.
  • Samphire Hoe

    The chalk cliffs at Dover form a vital element of the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, a nationally important and protected landscape. Samphire Hoe is one of the few places where one can truly appreciate the drama of the White Cliffs. Great care has been taken to make the landscape of Samphire Hoe fit in this dramatic setting.
    Samphire Hoe is an amazing place. There is something for everyone who enjoys the outdoors and wildlife: a stunning location and outstanding scenery, peace and quiet, walks, wildflowers, birds, sea angling and picnics. And the further you go from the car park, the wilder the site becomes. This tranquil setting never fails to impress, with many visitors coming back time and time again. In 2013, more than 80,000 visitors explored the nature reserve.
    Most of the Hoe is accessible for wheelchair and pushchairs and there is a recommended route signposted “Front path” and “West shore”.
    The site office provides a tea kiosk, which is open every weekend of the year and most days from Easter to September. There are toilet facilities, a RADAR based disabled access toilet and a baby changing room. Staff and volunteers are present to answer questions. There are also free leaflets, an information board and panels with the latest wildlife sightings.
  • White Cliffs of Dover

    The surrounding chalk cliffs have become known as the White cliffs of Dover, and the narrow sea passage nearby – the Strait of Dover. Its strategic position has been evident throughout its history: archaeological finds have revealed that the area has always been a focus for peoples entering and leaving Britain. The name of the town derives from the name of the river that flows through River Dour.
  • Dover

    Dover, 15 miles SE of Canterbury off the A2, is one of England's most important sea ports with exciting docks, Dover owes its existence to its proximity to France, the Eastern docks are a busy cross-channel port. The Romans developed Dover as their main naval base and it continued to be important, becoming a founder member of the Confederation of Cinque Ports founded by Edward I. Slowly the old harbour silted up, and it now lies under the town; a new harbour was built out into the English Channel in the 19th century.

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